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Dec 7, 2018

NBlog Dec 7 - who owns the silos?


Michael Rasmussen has published an interesting, thought-provoking piece about the common ground linking specialist areas such as risk, security and compliance, breaking down the silos.

“Achieving operational resiliency requires a connected view of risk to see the big picture of how risk interconnects and impacts the organization and its processes. A key aspect of this is the close relationship between operational risk management (ORM) and business continuity management (BCM). It baffles me how these two functions operate independently in most organizations when they have so much synergy.”

While Michael’s perspective makes sense, connecting, integrating or simply seeking alignment between diverse specialist functions is, let's say, challenging. Nevertheless, I personally would much rather collaborate with colleagues across the organization to find and jointly achieve shared goals that benefit the business than perpetuate today's blinkered silos and turf wars. At the very least, I'd like to understand what drives and constrains, inspires and concerns the rest of the organization, outside my little silo.

Once you start looking, there are lots of overlaps, common ground, points of mutual interest and concern. Here are a few illustrative examples:
  • Information risk, information security, information technology: the link is glaringly obvious, and yet usually the second words are emphasized leaving the first woefully neglected;
  • Risk and reward, challenge and opportunity: these are flip sides of the same coin that all parts of the business should appreciate. Management is all about both minimizing the former and maximizing the latter. Business is not a zero-sum game: it is meant to achieve objectives, typically profit and other forms of successful outcomes. And yes, that includes information security!
  • Business continuity involves achieving resilience for critical business functions, activities, systems, information flows, supplies, services etc., often by mitigating risks through suitable controls. The overlap between BCM, [information] risk management and [information] security is substantial, starting with the underlying issue of what 'critical' actually means to the organization;
  • Human Resources, Training, Health and Safety and Information Risk and Security are all concerned with people, as indeed is Management. People are tricky to direct and control. People have their own internal drivers and constraints, their biases and prejudices, aims and objectives. Taming the people without destroying the sparks of creativity and innovation that set us apart from the robots is a common challenge ... and, before long, taming those robots will be the next common challenge.

Dig deeper still and you'll also find points of mutual disinterest and conflicts within the organization. Marketing, for instance, yearns to obtain and exploit all the information it can possibly obtain on prospective customers, causing sleepless nights for the Privacy Officer. Operations find it convenient or necessary to use shared accounts on shop-floor IT systems in the interest of speed, efficiency, safety etc. whereas Information Risk and Security point out that they are prohibited under corporate-wide security policies for accountability and control reasons.

You could view the organization as a multi-dimensional framework of interconnections and tensions between its constituent parts, all heading towards roughly the same goal/s (hopefully!) but on occasions pulling any which way at different speeds to get there. To make matters still more complex, the web of influence extends beyond the organization through its proximal contacts to The World At Large. That takes us into the realm of chaos theory, global politics and sociology. 'Nuff said.

All the organization's activities fall under the umbrella of corporate governance, senior managers clarifying the organization's grand objectives and optimizing the organization's overall performance by  establishing and monitoring the corporate structures, hierarchies, strategies, policies and other directives, information flows, relationships, systems, management arrangements etc. necessary to achieve them. Driving alignment and reducing conflicts is part of the governance art. Silos are governance failures.

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